Who Invented The Stapler?

Ever wondered who invented the stapler? When was it made initially, and who came up with the idea of a practical device that could pierce and join sheets of paper?

Who came up with this beautiful device that no office can do without?

Well, wonder no longer.

So, who invented the stapler?

A few people are contenting for the title of the one who invented the stapler, all with fair points. But for the stapler, as we know today, we give credit to:

Henry R. Heyl

In 1877, Henry R. Heyl filed patent number 195603 for the first machine that inserted and clamped a staple in one operation, leading to some considering him the inventor of the modern stapler. In addition, Heyl filed patents for the Novelty Paper Box Manufacturing Company in 1876 and 1877.

In 1866, George McGill received a U.S. patent for a small, bendable brass paper fastener precursor to the contemporary staple. He obtained a U.K. patent for an auto stapler in 1868 and an American one in 1873. Albert Kletzker of St. Louis, MO, patented a device in the United States in 1870. H Gould of London got an English one in 1876 (both patents expired). These devices led to the invention of the modern stapler, so we thought it’s fair to mention them.

After the invention of the modern staplers in 1877, several companies began manufacturing and selling staplers.

Plews, for example, dates back to 1894 and is one of the oldest names in the industry; up until recently, it was located in Ohio. Other companies that started early include Acme, which introduced their Swingline brand (still a staple of home offices) around 1920. Chicago’s L.H. Birkenstock Company made “Burk” staplers beginning in 1916 (the company became part of Towa Corporation in 1968). After World War II, Stanley-National Co., which started making its Bostich line – beloved by homeowners.

Staplers became must-have equipment for every office.

Today, most staplers are electric, though there remains a healthy market for manual handheld models. Staples have changed little since the invention of the first all-metal machine model in 1877. Who would have thought that something so simple to use and beneficial to society at large could be invented by one man?

Types of Staplers

There are many different types of staplers available today, mainly categorized by the kind of paper they are designed for.

Some staplers punch out a single staple at a time. Heavy-duty triple-action staplers can staple up to 45 sheets or 60 pages of paper together in one quick press.

Some staples have been devised specifically for use in photocopiers. In contrast, others have been developed with special coatings designed to keep the legs from sticking together after usage. There even exists medical staples for surgical procedures!

These are the most popular types of staplers today:

1) Electric staplers

Electric staplers are the most popular type of stapler. They are used in every household and office. Electric staplers make it easier to staple because you don’t need to manually hold them together while getting the unit to join the sheets together.

2) Manual handheld Staplers

Manual handheld staplers come in many different shapes and sizes and require you to place your hands on either side of the handle and push down. You need to push until it has joined two sheets of paper together like a pair of scissors. These models usually allow for fewer staples than electric models. This makes them ideal for home use but not that great for places with plenty of paperwork, such as an office setting. Who would want tired arms after spending all day using manual handheld staplers!

3) Personal Staplers (miniature desktop models)

Personal staplers are small and lightweight, making them the best choice for people who staple a little bit of paper together. These mini staplers come in various shapes and sizes. There is an average of 10 to 20 sheet capacity on each staple. This means you can’t use these types of mini desktop staplers for jobs such as packaging or an office. You probably will run out of staples way before finishing what you were working on.

4) Heavy Duty Staplers

Heavy-Duty Staplers usually have more than 1 hole where you can place your paper to secure more than one sheet of paper together. Heavy-Duty Staplers are used mainly by businesses and offices that staple many documents that need to be kept for long periods.

5) Desktop Staplers that staple up to 20 sheets of paper together

Desktop staplers can staple up to 20 sheets at maximum capacity, making them the best choice for offices that do lots of paperwork daily. Desktop staplers come in many different shapes and sizes but make sure you choose one that has more than 1 hole where you can put your papers through. This will save time because it doesn’t matter how fast you move. You won’t get tired when using desktop staplers with more than 2 holes (where you can put your papers through). Whoever invented this rule is a genius!

6) Heavy Duty Mini staplers who staple up to 60 sheets together

Heavy Duty Mini Staplers are made of plastic, so they are not heavy on your hands when using them. These types of mini staplers usually have more than 2 holes where you can put your papers through, making it easier for you to get things done faster. The significant disadvantage with these mini staplers is that they can’t staple more than 60,000 sheets because the plates might bend or break if more sheets are on the scale.

7) Pneumatic Stapler who staples up to 1-inch thick paper together

The pneumatic stapler is used by most offices that staple many documents together daily. Pneumatic staplers are typically used by companies that have massive paperwork. These types of staplers can staple up to 1-inch thick paper together, which is way more than the capacity of a standard desktop stapler. This means that you don’t need to worry about plates bending or breaking. The man who invented the stapler was a genius!

There you have it. Now you know who invented the stapler. Make sure to share this knowledge with your colleagues in the office next time you use one! Also, check other articles on who invented the rest of the office supplies!